Peterhead Power Station

Peterhead Power Station

31.05.2014
Carbon sequestration and storage (CSS) technology could reduce UK energy costs by up to £45 billion over the next three decades. As the energy hub of Europe, North-East Scotland is already well-placed and prepared, with the the skills-base and industrial infrastructure to drive forward CSS. Ministers are depending on getting the technology working at scale as a major part of decarbonising electricity generation in order to meet targets to tackle climate change.

Consortium bid leaders Shell UK Limited, with strategic support from Scottish Hydro-Electric owner Scottish & Southern Energy (SSE), have been awarded UK government funding for onshore elements of carbon capture and storage (CCS) Front-End Engineering and Design (FEED) work at Peterhead Power Station (PPS). On Aberdeenshire's coast at the most easterly point of the Scottish mainland, gas-fired PPS began operation in 1982. It is owned and operated by SSE. Similar FEED funding was awarded last year to Drax’s White Rose Project in Yorkshire, where a coal-burning CCS operation is planned. Lock up your Carbon. New Scientist article

At PPS, Shell have awarded the FEED contract to Technip, who undertook a pre-FEED study for the project 18 months ago. The scope includes modifications to the existing (combined cycle gas turbine) power plant. Retro-fitting cutting-edge, embryonic technology at PPS will create the world’s first commercial-scale CCS plant. Using post-combustion capture and derivatives of ammonia to absorb waste carbon dioxide (CO2), the project would remove harmful greenhouse gas from the plant’s flue-gas stream. Over three decades at PPS, a million tonnes of CO2 emissions per annum in the form of liquified carbon will be transported to the St Fergus Terminal to be compressed, then pumped offshore for long-term storage in Shell’s Goldeneye gas reservoir.

Wood Group Kenny (WGK) has won the FEED contract for the subsea and pipeline element of the CCS project at PPS. The Aberdeen-based firm will design the new CO2 export pipeline for the scheme, to include a tie-in with the existing Goldeneye pipeline. Under the deal, WGK will also develop a new subsea intervention valve and landfall solution at PPS.

Overall 90% of UK CO2 produced by fossil fuel use in electricity generation could be sequestrated by CCS. A bridge technology, carbon abatement will make gas and coal-fired power stations more efficient and greener, mitigating climate change, although carbon emissions would increase with enhanced fossil fuel recovery. Income inequality mirrors high carbon emissions. Income inequality and carbon emissions

A low carbon future is central to tackling the challenge of climate change. World energy demands are projected to grow by 40% over the next 20 years: fossil fuels will still be required. The head of Ofgem has warned of a real chance that Britain will run out of electricity within the next 3 years if fuel prices rise to a politically unacceptable level.

Scotland could capitalise on geographic advantages, infrastructure, offshore storage capacity in saline aquifers and disused hydrocarbon reservoirs such as Goldeneye, the existing oil and gas skills-base and other industrial assets to become a leader in the development and deployment of CCS technology. Other European countries need to bury their carbon. A key to sustainability, CCS will help to maximise the benefits and competitive advantage that transition to a low carbon economy brings to a region and its residents. Additionally CCS can be used in chemical processing, and cement/steel manufacture.

Peterhead is the UK's busiest and one of Europe's largest white-fish ports. The town boasts a sheltered deep-water harbour with 24hr access and 3K of berthing. News of quayside investment and green initiatives boost the potential of the Buchan area. Local work decommissioning North Sea Oil installations is forecast.

Critical in any future plans, PPS could expand to house the world's first demonstrator of gas CCS from one end of the process to the other. The technology could extend the life of facilities at Peterhead by 10 years, inject £20 billion into the economy, create 1000 construction (and future operational) jobs, and reduce UK energy costs by £45 billion over the next 30 years. A vital cog in our energy mix, CCS will be neither fully operational or cost-competitive until the mid-2020s. Dear George Osborne, we all want cost-effective climate action. James Murray, BusinessGreen editor's blog

A final investment decision on the construction of the two demonstration projects will be taken by the UK government in 2015. A previous venture for PPS to pioneer CCS using the Miller field floundered in 2007 when BP was allowed to make threats and then abandoned the project, blaming uncertainty and continual UK government delays. A tax on carbon emissions was a factor in the collapse of a CCS project at coal-fired Longannet in Fife (now due to be shut down). By applying carbon tax to the project, the Government proposed to provide £1bn in funding, then take away £250million in emissions tax.

At Port Arthur, Texas, a CCs demo project was completed in four years and came in under budget. It has stored over a million tonnes of CO2 underground.

There are plans to cable energy from PPS to Norway and the rest of Europe, and to England via a two gigawatt (GW) Eastern Link, highlighting Peterhead's position as a hub for energy businesses, particularly from the renewables sector. Despite the efforts and resources of the bullying Donald Trump, the European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre facility with 11 test turbines is on course for installation in Aberdeen Bay.

Statoil propose to anchor a quintet of tethered, floating wind turbines at Buchan Deep, 12 miles off Peterhead. The energy giant's innovative Hywind 2 project will be grid-connected, a commercial launchpad for a sector that saw its maiden full-scale prototype, Hywind 1, switched on in June 2009 off Western Norway. Hywind 1's float tower was constructed by Technip.

The Scottish Government is considering marine licence applications for Hywind 2. Statoil is spearheading the pilot programme and awaiting onshore and offshore planning consent. Statoil hope to make a final investment decision in September 2015. The water at Buchan Deep is 100M deep: engineers believe the technology could be used in water up to 10x that depth. With a population of 18,500, Peterhead could be totally powered by five 6MW turbines.the aim is for the scheme to be sustainable without government subsidies.

While coal remains a major source of energy power in Asia, Europe and the US have been switching to gas. Grangemouth refinery owners Ineos have commissioned quays and a giant ethane tank to contain and process imported US (shale) gas. The UK Government froze the largest carbon tax in the 2014 UK Budget - a move that abandons any further increases in the Carbon Price Floor and favours coal-fired power generation. Hefty compensation measures were offered to carbon intensive businesses in the Budget.

January 2014 figures reveal that the UK gas industry received £19.6m to help 'balance out' the National Grid, compared to £3.6m in constraint management costs for energy produced from wind. After Scottish Power's recent closure of Cockenzie power station in East Lothian, Scotland has more capacity from renewable electricity than from fossil fuel-powered stations for the first time, at 5.7GW and 5.4GW respectively. The Scottish Government is aiming to generate 100% of the country’s electricity demand (and set to meet a target of 30% of total energy consumption) from renewable sources by 2020.

'The efficiency of our energy system is greatly reduced because of a lack of proper storage. Scotland would meet its ambitious renewables targets significantly quicker with efficient storage.' The Future of the Energy Storage industry in Scotland, Brian Richardson. Producing energy 'at the wrong time'

Public energy demand can be reduced by radical measures, some emergent - better insulation for existing buildings, constructing homes requiring less energy use, green transport initiatives, community switching, biomass and not-for-profit heat-and-power units.

"Demonstrating CCS would enable us to test the technology and cut emissions while we transition to a renewable future. Scotland is well-placed to develop CCS – a potentially important global technology. It's great to hear that we might be about to start turning this opportunity into a reality." World Wildlife Fund Scotland director Lang Banks on the FEED funding award to PPS.

"CCS is a great opportunity to reinvigorate our manufacturing sector and bring research, design and construction jobs to North-East Scotland and Yorkshire. Our depleted gas and oilfields make the UK one of the best areas in the world to exploit CCS technology." TUC General Secretary Frances O'Grady, February 2014.

The need for a real green industrial policy has never been clearer. Osborne's decision to help out heavy industry and coal power begs one question - how will we decarbonise carbon intensive firms? James' Blog features musings, observations and occasional rants from BusinessGreen editor James Murray
Ref:
Date:
2012-07-27 00:00:00.0
Location:
Photographer:
Peterhead Power Station

Peterhead Power Station

31.05.2014
Carbon sequestration and storage (CSS) technology could reduce UK energy costs by up to £45 billion over the next three decades. As the energy hub of Europe, North-East Scotland is already well-placed and prepared, with the the skills-base and industrial infrastructure to drive forward CSS. Ministers are depending on getting the technology working at scale as a major part of decarbonising electricity generation in order to meet targets to tackle climate change.

Consortium bid leaders Shell UK Limited, with strategic support from Scottish Hydro-Electric owner Scottish & Southern Energy (SSE), have been awarded UK government funding for onshore elements of carbon capture and storage (CCS) Front-End Engineering and Design (FEED) work at Peterhead Power Station (PPS). On Aberdeenshire's coast at the most easterly point of the Scottish mainland, gas-fired PPS began operation in 1982. It is owned and operated by SSE. Similar FEED funding was awarded last year to Drax’s White Rose Project in Yorkshire, where a coal-burning CCS operation is planned. Lock up your Carbon. New Scientist article

At PPS, Shell have awarded the FEED contract to Technip, who undertook a pre-FEED study for the project 18 months ago. The scope includes modifications to the existing (combined cycle gas turbine) power plant. Retro-fitting cutting-edge, embryonic technology at PPS will create the world’s first commercial-scale CCS plant. Using post-combustion capture and derivatives of ammonia to absorb waste carbon dioxide (CO2), the project would remove harmful greenhouse gas from the plant’s flue-gas stream. Over three decades at PPS, a million tonnes of CO2 emissions per annum in the form of liquified carbon will be transported to the St Fergus Terminal to be compressed, then pumped offshore for long-term storage in Shell’s Goldeneye gas reservoir.

Wood Group Kenny (WGK) has won the FEED contract for the subsea and pipeline element of the CCS project at PPS. The Aberdeen-based firm will design the new CO2 export pipeline for the scheme, to include a tie-in with the existing Goldeneye pipeline. Under the deal, WGK will also develop a new subsea intervention valve and landfall solution at PPS.

Overall 90% of UK CO2 produced by fossil fuel use in electricity generation could be sequestrated by CCS. A bridge technology, carbon abatement will make gas and coal-fired power stations more efficient and greener, mitigating climate change, although carbon emissions would increase with enhanced fossil fuel recovery. Income inequality mirrors high carbon emissions. Income inequality and carbon emissions

A low carbon future is central to tackling the challenge of climate change. World energy demands are projected to grow by 40% over the next 20 years: fossil fuels will still be required. The head of Ofgem has warned of a real chance that Britain will run out of electricity within the next 3 years if fuel prices rise to a politically unacceptable level.

Scotland could capitalise on geographic advantages, infrastructure, offshore storage capacity in saline aquifers and disused hydrocarbon reservoirs such as Goldeneye, the existing oil and gas skills-base and other industrial assets to become a leader in the development and deployment of CCS technology. Other European countries need to bury their carbon. A key to sustainability, CCS will help to maximise the benefits and competitive advantage that transition to a low carbon economy brings to a region and its residents. Additionally CCS can be used in chemical processing, and cement/steel manufacture.

Peterhead is the UK's busiest and one of Europe's largest white-fish ports. The town boasts a sheltered deep-water harbour with 24hr access and 3K of berthing. News of quayside investment and green initiatives boost the potential of the Buchan area. Local work decommissioning North Sea Oil installations is forecast.

Critical in any future plans, PPS could expand to house the world's first demonstrator of gas CCS from one end of the process to the other. The technology could extend the life of facilities at Peterhead by 10 years, inject £20 billion into the economy, create 1000 construction (and future operational) jobs, and reduce UK energy costs by £45 billion over the next 30 years. A vital cog in our energy mix, CCS will be neither fully operational or cost-competitive until the mid-2020s. Dear George Osborne, we all want cost-effective climate action. James Murray, BusinessGreen editor's blog

A final investment decision on the construction of the two demonstration projects will be taken by the UK government in 2015. A previous venture for PPS to pioneer CCS using the Miller field floundered in 2007 when BP was allowed to make threats and then abandoned the project, blaming uncertainty and continual UK government delays. A tax on carbon emissions was a factor in the collapse of a CCS project at coal-fired Longannet in Fife (now due to be shut down). By applying carbon tax to the project, the Government proposed to provide £1bn in funding, then take away £250million in emissions tax.

At Port Arthur, Texas, a CCs demo project was completed in four years and came in under budget. It has stored over a million tonnes of CO2 underground.

There are plans to cable energy from PPS to Norway and the rest of Europe, and to England via a two gigawatt (GW) Eastern Link, highlighting Peterhead's position as a hub for energy businesses, particularly from the renewables sector. Despite the efforts and resources of the bullying Donald Trump, the European Offshore Wind Deployment Centre facility with 11 test turbines is on course for installation in Aberdeen Bay.

Statoil propose to anchor a quintet of tethered, floating wind turbines at Buchan Deep, 12 miles off Peterhead. The energy giant's innovative Hywind 2 project will be grid-connected, a commercial launchpad for a sector that saw its maiden full-scale prototype, Hywind 1, switched on in June 2009 off Western Norway. Hywind 1's float tower was constructed by Technip.

The Scottish Government is considering marine licence applications for Hywind 2. Statoil is spearheading the pilot programme and awaiting onshore and offshore planning consent. Statoil hope to make a final investment decision in September 2015. The water at Buchan Deep is 100M deep: engineers believe the technology could be used in water up to 10x that depth. With a population of 18,500, Peterhead could be totally powered by five 6MW turbines.the aim is for the scheme to be sustainable without government subsidies.

While coal remains a major source of energy power in Asia, Europe and the US have been switching to gas. Grangemouth refinery owners Ineos have commissioned quays and a giant ethane tank to contain and process imported US (shale) gas. The UK Government froze the largest carbon tax in the 2014 UK Budget - a move that abandons any further increases in the Carbon Price Floor and favours coal-fired power generation. Hefty compensation measures were offered to carbon intensive businesses in the Budget.

January 2014 figures reveal that the UK gas industry received £19.6m to help 'balance out' the National Grid, compared to £3.6m in constraint management costs for energy produced from wind. After Scottish Power's recent closure of Cockenzie power station in East Lothian, Scotland has more capacity from renewable electricity than from fossil fuel-powered stations for the first time, at 5.7GW and 5.4GW respectively. The Scottish Government is aiming to generate 100% of the country’s electricity demand (and set to meet a target of 30% of total energy consumption) from renewable sources by 2020.

'The efficiency of our energy system is greatly reduced because of a lack of proper storage. Scotland would meet its ambitious renewables targets significantly quicker with efficient storage.' The Future of the Energy Storage industry in Scotland, Brian Richardson. Producing energy 'at the wrong time'

Public energy demand can be reduced by radical measures, some emergent - better insulation for existing buildings, constructing homes requiring less energy use, green transport initiatives, community switching, biomass and not-for-profit heat-and-power units.

"Demonstrating CCS would enable us to test the technology and cut emissions while we transition to a renewable future. Scotland is well-placed to develop CCS – a potentially important global technology. It's great to hear that we might be about to start turning this opportunity into a reality." World Wildlife Fund Scotland director Lang Banks on the FEED funding award to PPS.

"CCS is a great opportunity to reinvigorate our manufacturing sector and bring research, design and construction jobs to North-East Scotland and Yorkshire. Our depleted gas and oilfields make the UK one of the best areas in the world to exploit CCS technology." TUC General Secretary Frances O'Grady, February 2014.

The need for a real green industrial policy has never been clearer. Osborne's decision to help out heavy industry and coal power begs one question - how will we decarbonise carbon intensive firms? James' Blog features musings, observations and occasional rants from BusinessGreen editor James Murray
Ref:
Date:
2012-07-27 00:00:00.0
Location:
Photographer: