Cruden Bay beach. The Ladies Bridge over the Water of Cruden; Bram Stoker and the Kilmarnock Arms Hotel; the Buchan Divers; Tartan Army; Winston Churchill; crude in the Bay; nudists; Peter Pan.

Cruden Bay beach. The Ladies Bridge over the Water of Cruden; Bram Stoker and the Kilmarnock Arms Hotel; the Buchan Divers; Tartan Army; Winston Churchill; crude in the Bay; nudists; Peter Pan.

There follows a discursive, eclectic article.

Renamed in 1924, Cruden Bay was originally known as Invercruden: Port Erroll is the older (harbour) part of the village. The dramatic impact that the coming of rail made, the challenging Tom Morris-designed golf course, the impressive Cruden Bay Hotel, the facilities at the Kilmarnock Arms Hotel and the Red House Hotel all contributed to a guide book description in 1907 of Invercruden as the 'Brighton of Aberdeenshire'. Only the renowned golf course and the Kilmarnock Arms remain (open).

Work to replace the delapidated Ladies Bridge began in March 2015, using the existing stone piers. It is now finished and open. The bridge provides the only direct access to Cruden Bay's beach from Port Erroll over the Water of Cruden. Dating back to 1922, the bridge is named after women from the village who raised the funds to build it.

Irish writer Bram Stoker was a visitor to the Kilmarnock Arms in 1893 and 1895. Stoker and his family stayed at the Red House after 'Dracula' was published in 1897. New Slains Castle to the north of Cruden Bay was the inspiration for Count Dracula’s castle: Cruden Bay beach features in Stoker's 'The Mystery of the Sea' and 'The Watter's Mou'.

Nobody batted an eyelid recently when a stranger entered the Killie Arms and asked to view Bram's signature in the guestbook. The visitor was dressed as Dracula. A later change into his birthday suit proved a step too far when he fancied a pint in Balmedie after visiting the nearby nudists' beach.

Winston Churchill's visit to Cruden Bay in 1908. How a visit to Scotland almost cost Churchill his Clementine

In May 2012 a sub-aqua team from the Buchan Divers discovered a U-1206 Nazi submarine at a depth of 70M south-east of Cruden Bay. The wreck was originally found during oil exploration in the 1970s, but documents showing the location were apparently lost. Three weeks before the end of World War 2, the U-boat was forced to surface after a crewman in a toilet caused a gas leak. During a subsequent attack by British patrols, the submarine was scuttled. Three of her crew died, and twenty-seven were captured, some ashore whilst scaling the cliffs near Whinnyfold. Earlier in their decade-long mission to locate the sub, the Buchan Divers had found the Hull-registered Windward Ho trawler, which sank with her crew of eight after being hit by a mine during World War I.

Cruden Bay beach is the landfall for the (BP) Forties oil pipeline, though where the pipeline carrying the crude reaches the beach isn't visible. Just don't let the kiddies or the mutt dig too deep. Via the Whinnyfold pumping station between the Bay and Collieston, the pipeline is 110 miles in length and transports 500,000 barrels of oil a day – half of the entire output of Scotland's North Sea rigs and platforms – to the Kinneil processing plant at Grangemouth. Following the route may attract the attention of security staff and 'Grampian's finest'. Taking photographs of the pumping station is not recommended.

The ceremony at Dyce to mark the pipeline's official opening on November 2nd 1975 was attended by the Queen and Prime Minister Harold Wilson. It was marked by Scotland's largest-ever police operation. (I remember it well.) Officials were worried by threats from the Tartan Army to disrupt the ceremony or bomb the pipeline. They'd made four attempts to damage the pipeline in the previous two years. The attacks caused no serious damage, but the Tartan Army said these had merely been 'dress rehearsals'. The Tartan Army was a small extremist Republican group - Jihaggists of their day - and had nothing to do with the nation’s present-day loyal football supporters.

Let's head south. A stand-off over insurance between Scottish Water and BP has seen work on a water pipeline in Angus aborted. The new £2.65 million infrastructure may never become operational. Scottish Water installed three miles of an outfall pipeline from Kirriemuir sewage works to the River Dean near Glamis without securing a standard liability agreement against potential damage to the Forties pipeline, which crosses the proposed route of the outfall pipe. The dispute is the failure of project management. It has dragged on for months, adding to project costs. One affected local landowner calls it "a Third World cock-up". Negotiations with Shell over a separate affected pipeline (St Fergus to Mossmoran in Fife) are also ongoing. Kirriemuir is best-known as the birthplace of author and playwright J.M. Barrie, the creator of Peter Pan. The project manager responsible for this Scottish Water fiasco was last spotted in the local Primary School seated between Peter and Wendy, studying law, land and local maps.
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Cruden Bay beach. The Ladies Bridge over the Water of Cruden; Bram Stoker and the Kilmarnock Arms Hotel; the Buchan Divers; Tartan Army; Winston Churchill; crude in the Bay; nudists; Peter Pan.

Cruden Bay beach. The Ladies Bridge over the Water of Cruden; Bram Stoker and the Kilmarnock Arms Hotel; the Buchan Divers; Tartan Army; Winston Churchill; crude in the Bay; nudists; Peter Pan.

There follows a discursive, eclectic article.

Renamed in 1924, Cruden Bay was originally known as Invercruden: Port Erroll is the older (harbour) part of the village. The dramatic impact that the coming of rail made, the challenging Tom Morris-designed golf course, the impressive Cruden Bay Hotel, the facilities at the Kilmarnock Arms Hotel and the Red House Hotel all contributed to a guide book description in 1907 of Invercruden as the 'Brighton of Aberdeenshire'. Only the renowned golf course and the Kilmarnock Arms remain (open).

Work to replace the delapidated Ladies Bridge began in March 2015, using the existing stone piers. It is now finished and open. The bridge provides the only direct access to Cruden Bay's beach from Port Erroll over the Water of Cruden. Dating back to 1922, the bridge is named after women from the village who raised the funds to build it.

Irish writer Bram Stoker was a visitor to the Kilmarnock Arms in 1893 and 1895. Stoker and his family stayed at the Red House after 'Dracula' was published in 1897. New Slains Castle to the north of Cruden Bay was the inspiration for Count Dracula’s castle: Cruden Bay beach features in Stoker's 'The Mystery of the Sea' and 'The Watter's Mou'.

Nobody batted an eyelid recently when a stranger entered the Killie Arms and asked to view Bram's signature in the guestbook. The visitor was dressed as Dracula. A later change into his birthday suit proved a step too far when he fancied a pint in Balmedie after visiting the nearby nudists' beach.

Winston Churchill's visit to Cruden Bay in 1908. How a visit to Scotland almost cost Churchill his Clementine

In May 2012 a sub-aqua team from the Buchan Divers discovered a U-1206 Nazi submarine at a depth of 70M south-east of Cruden Bay. The wreck was originally found during oil exploration in the 1970s, but documents showing the location were apparently lost. Three weeks before the end of World War 2, the U-boat was forced to surface after a crewman in a toilet caused a gas leak. During a subsequent attack by British patrols, the submarine was scuttled. Three of her crew died, and twenty-seven were captured, some ashore whilst scaling the cliffs near Whinnyfold. Earlier in their decade-long mission to locate the sub, the Buchan Divers had found the Hull-registered Windward Ho trawler, which sank with her crew of eight after being hit by a mine during World War I.

Cruden Bay beach is the landfall for the (BP) Forties oil pipeline, though where the pipeline carrying the crude reaches the beach isn't visible. Just don't let the kiddies or the mutt dig too deep. Via the Whinnyfold pumping station between the Bay and Collieston, the pipeline is 110 miles in length and transports 500,000 barrels of oil a day – half of the entire output of Scotland's North Sea rigs and platforms – to the Kinneil processing plant at Grangemouth. Following the route may attract the attention of security staff and 'Grampian's finest'. Taking photographs of the pumping station is not recommended.

The ceremony at Dyce to mark the pipeline's official opening on November 2nd 1975 was attended by the Queen and Prime Minister Harold Wilson. It was marked by Scotland's largest-ever police operation. (I remember it well.) Officials were worried by threats from the Tartan Army to disrupt the ceremony or bomb the pipeline. They'd made four attempts to damage the pipeline in the previous two years. The attacks caused no serious damage, but the Tartan Army said these had merely been 'dress rehearsals'. The Tartan Army was a small extremist Republican group - Jihaggists of their day - and had nothing to do with the nation’s present-day loyal football supporters.

Let's head south. A stand-off over insurance between Scottish Water and BP has seen work on a water pipeline in Angus aborted. The new £2.65 million infrastructure may never become operational. Scottish Water installed three miles of an outfall pipeline from Kirriemuir sewage works to the River Dean near Glamis without securing a standard liability agreement against potential damage to the Forties pipeline, which crosses the proposed route of the outfall pipe. The dispute is the failure of project management. It has dragged on for months, adding to project costs. One affected local landowner calls it "a Third World cock-up". Negotiations with Shell over a separate affected pipeline (St Fergus to Mossmoran in Fife) are also ongoing. Kirriemuir is best-known as the birthplace of author and playwright J.M. Barrie, the creator of Peter Pan. The project manager responsible for this Scottish Water fiasco was last spotted in the local Primary School seated between Peter and Wendy, studying law, land and local maps.
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