Dead cow and lard

Dead cow and lard

Washed up at Cransdale after December storms.

Now the ocean has a cholesterol problem. On December 21st 2012, a dead cow and several sturdy lumps of lard were washed up on Collieston and Cransdale beaches. Some said it was an Act of God and that 'the lard moves in mysterious ways'. It is claimed that the depth of swell during December storms freed the fat from the wreck of a merchant ship, either MS Taurus or SS Queensbury. Many vessels in convoy were bombed by the Germans off the North-East coast during World War II. Lard was widely used on ships - and it's still high on chandlers' lists - for greasing and waterproofing, mainly ropes.
This is a tenuous link, but the British Heart Foundation reports that the average Brit consumed the equivalent of half a pack of lard on Christmas Day.

Four large, barrel-shaped pieces of lard appeared on the shore at the St Cyrus Nature Reserve near Montrose in mid-January. A Scottish Natural Heritage spokesperson said the lard was covered in large barnacles, but that it was a brilliant white colour underneath and smelled good enough to have a fry up with.. Her dog loved it. Lard deposited in the 1980s at Stonehaven (later the birthplace of deep-fried Mars bars) caused dogs eating it to take ill. A decision was taken to set fire to the lard after some of the dogs died. Considering it also may be shot through with German bullets, feeding it to your dog, fry-ups and setting fire to it seem dodgy options.
Ref:
Date:
2012-12-26 00:00:00.0
Location:
Photographer:
Yvonne Ferguson
Dead cow and lard

Dead cow and lard

Washed up at Cransdale after December storms.

Now the ocean has a cholesterol problem. On December 21st 2012, a dead cow and several sturdy lumps of lard were washed up on Collieston and Cransdale beaches. Some said it was an Act of God and that 'the lard moves in mysterious ways'. It is claimed that the depth of swell during December storms freed the fat from the wreck of a merchant ship, either MS Taurus or SS Queensbury. Many vessels in convoy were bombed by the Germans off the North-East coast during World War II. Lard was widely used on ships - and it's still high on chandlers' lists - for greasing and waterproofing, mainly ropes.
This is a tenuous link, but the British Heart Foundation reports that the average Brit consumed the equivalent of half a pack of lard on Christmas Day.

Four large, barrel-shaped pieces of lard appeared on the shore at the St Cyrus Nature Reserve near Montrose in mid-January. A Scottish Natural Heritage spokesperson said the lard was covered in large barnacles, but that it was a brilliant white colour underneath and smelled good enough to have a fry up with.. Her dog loved it. Lard deposited in the 1980s at Stonehaven (later the birthplace of deep-fried Mars bars) caused dogs eating it to take ill. A decision was taken to set fire to the lard after some of the dogs died. Considering it also may be shot through with German bullets, feeding it to your dog, fry-ups and setting fire to it seem dodgy options.
Ref:
Date:
2012-12-26 00:00:00.0
Location:
Photographer:
Yvonne Ferguson