River Spey

River Spey

Salmon catches declined in 2013, says the Spey Fishery Board.

The Spey is the seventh largest river in Britain. It emerges from Loch Spey in the Monadhliath Mountains and flows into the Moray Firth at Spey Bay on Scotland's North-East coast. It is regarded as a classic Scottish salmon fishing river.

Last year was one of the most challenging in recent times for anglers on some of Scotland's rivers. Salmon catches on the Spey in 2013 numbered 5,780 against a 10-year average of 9,000 fish. 11,500 salmon were caught on the Spey in both 2006 and 2008.

Low water levels as a result of long spells of dry weather in the summer was among the causes. Fishing has improved compared to low catch years like 1976 when there was a severe drought. The stock of returning adult salmon are so low it is close to or below self-sustainable levels.

Spey Fishery Board's director, Roger Knight told BBC Radio Scotland: "2013 proved to be a particularly challenging one for anglers and that was reflected in our catches. That situation was not peculiar to the River Spey. It was a pattern reflected across many rivers across Scotland throughout last year. Another problem on the Spey was that significant volumes of water were diverted for hydro electric schemes. Warming sea temperatures also affected food sources for salmon on their migration routes and feeding grounds."

The Association of Salmon Fisheries Board wants netters and anglers to stop killing salmon until May 15th to allow the most vulnerable, early fish to run upriver. It is unclear whether this is also a suggested catch-and-release ban, a damaging practice not used by netsmen.

On February 11th at Aberlour, the traditional opening ceremony was held for the Spey salmon season.
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River Spey

River Spey

Salmon catches declined in 2013, says the Spey Fishery Board.

The Spey is the seventh largest river in Britain. It emerges from Loch Spey in the Monadhliath Mountains and flows into the Moray Firth at Spey Bay on Scotland's North-East coast. It is regarded as a classic Scottish salmon fishing river.

Last year was one of the most challenging in recent times for anglers on some of Scotland's rivers. Salmon catches on the Spey in 2013 numbered 5,780 against a 10-year average of 9,000 fish. 11,500 salmon were caught on the Spey in both 2006 and 2008.

Low water levels as a result of long spells of dry weather in the summer was among the causes. Fishing has improved compared to low catch years like 1976 when there was a severe drought. The stock of returning adult salmon are so low it is close to or below self-sustainable levels.

Spey Fishery Board's director, Roger Knight told BBC Radio Scotland: "2013 proved to be a particularly challenging one for anglers and that was reflected in our catches. That situation was not peculiar to the River Spey. It was a pattern reflected across many rivers across Scotland throughout last year. Another problem on the Spey was that significant volumes of water were diverted for hydro electric schemes. Warming sea temperatures also affected food sources for salmon on their migration routes and feeding grounds."

The Association of Salmon Fisheries Board wants netters and anglers to stop killing salmon until May 15th to allow the most vulnerable, early fish to run upriver. It is unclear whether this is also a suggested catch-and-release ban, a damaging practice not used by netsmen.

On February 11th at Aberlour, the traditional opening ceremony was held for the Spey salmon season.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: