Centenary of the first manned flight across the North Sea by Norwegian aviator Lieutenant Tryggve Gran

Centenary of the first manned flight across the North Sea by Norwegian aviator Lieutenant Tryggve Gran

Norwegian aviator Lieutenant Tryggve Gran had already helped locate the bodies of Captain Scott and his companions in the Antarctic, flown the Channel and looped the loop, when in July 1914, a few days before war was declared, he flew Ca Flotte, his small Bleriot X1-2 monoplane, from Cruden Bay beach to south of Stavanger in Norway. The 305 mile flight took him 4 hours and 10 minutes. On July 30th 2014, guided by a traditional compass, two Norwegian pilots flew a microlight across the North Sea to mark the centenary of Tryggve's inaugural manned flight.

Between the Saltire of Scotland and the Norwegian flag in Cruden Old Church hung a model of the monoplane which Tryggve piloted to fly the North Sea for the first time. It was made by the children of Port Erroll and Hatton schools. In 1967 Tryggve visited the village on the 53rd anniversary of his pioneer flight.
In 1971 a granite and copper monument celebrating Tryggve's feat was erected in the village.
Ref:
Date:
2014-08-23 00:00:00.0
Location:
Port Erroll, Cruden Bay
Photographer:
Yvonne Ferguson
Centenary of the first manned flight across the North Sea by Norwegian aviator Lieutenant Tryggve Gran

Centenary of the first manned flight across the North Sea by Norwegian aviator Lieutenant Tryggve Gran

Norwegian aviator Lieutenant Tryggve Gran had already helped locate the bodies of Captain Scott and his companions in the Antarctic, flown the Channel and looped the loop, when in July 1914, a few days before war was declared, he flew Ca Flotte, his small Bleriot X1-2 monoplane, from Cruden Bay beach to south of Stavanger in Norway. The 305 mile flight took him 4 hours and 10 minutes. On July 30th 2014, guided by a traditional compass, two Norwegian pilots flew a microlight across the North Sea to mark the centenary of Tryggve's inaugural manned flight.

Between the Saltire of Scotland and the Norwegian flag in Cruden Old Church hung a model of the monoplane which Tryggve piloted to fly the North Sea for the first time. It was made by the children of Port Erroll and Hatton schools. In 1967 Tryggve visited the village on the 53rd anniversary of his pioneer flight.
In 1971 a granite and copper monument celebrating Tryggve's feat was erected in the village.
Ref:
Date:
2014-08-23 00:00:00.0
Location:
Port Erroll, Cruden Bay
Photographer:
Yvonne Ferguson