A stuffed wildcat, Felis silvestris, in the Zoology Department, Aberdeen University

A stuffed wildcat, Felis silvestris, in the Zoology Department, Aberdeen University

WILDCATS, EAGLES and SALMON

Press release from Vicky MacDonald, Scottish Wildcat Action 30.01.2016
Stuffed wildcat photograph: Yvonne Ferguson

The largest-ever survey of Scottish wildcats is now underway with more than three hundred cameras live. The survey focuses on the wildcat priority areas of Scotland - Strathpeffer, Strathbogie, Strathavon, North Strathspey and the Angus Glens.

The cameras will monitor movements over a sixty-day period. Survey methods are informed by published scientific studies and a practical hands-on approach. More than one hundred and thirty volunteers will check the cameras. Data gathered will help inform wildcat protection measures including an extensive neutering campaign to stop feral and pet cats from interbreeding and passing on diseases.

Many wildcats in Scotland contain some domestic cat ancestry and wildcats will continue to become less distinctive if this is left unchecked. Scottish Wildcat Action is committed to reducing the risk of interbreeding between wildcats and domestic cats or obvious hybrids. This includes working with local communities and estates to protect our remaining wildcats and gearing up for a co-ordinated Trap Neuter Vaccinate and Release programme next summer. Unowned domestic cats and obvious hybrids will be trapped, neutered and vaccinated before being returned to the wild under licence from Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

The Scottish Wildcat is one of our most endangered mammals and our only remaining native cat. It urgently needs action to save shrinking populations in the wild. Following habitat loss and persecution through the 19th century, the wildcat is now restricted in the U.K. to the Scottish Highlands. More about the project and to report sightings of wild-living cats

No genetically-pure wildcats have been identified in the last thirty years. It may have lost all of its nine lives


Unusual wildlife tales – eagles and salmon

Almost 200 years have elapsed since the 1816 journey of writer Elizabeth Isabella Spence to the North Highlands, which left some unusual accounts of interactions between humans and nature. Two in particular stand out; both concern the countryside around the Falls of Kilmorack on the River Beauly. The rocks above the river were ‘infested with eagles’ and the nests the birds built, while on steep precipices, were nevertheless accessible to people who had the relevant skill and nerve. One ‘poor cottager’ was noted as regularly providing his large family with young lambs, kids and poultry on the kitchen table and he was suspected of obtaining these items by theft. The accusation was only true insofar as he was found to be daily plundering eyries to feed his own offspring.

An even stranger account is of ‘an experiment’ conducted by Fraser of Lovat. Salmon were regularly seen leaping their way through the Falls and sometimes landing on the flat rocks adjacent to the water. Lovat made a wager that, ‘if a fire were lighted on one of the rocks verging on the river, and a pot boiled on it, a salmon, taking a contrary leap, would plunge into the boiler, and be dressed, ready for eating, without the aid of cooking’. According to Spence, he ‘gained his wager’. Such a remarkable occurrence would be impossible today: the Falls disappeared when a hydro-electric scheme was built in the 1960s.
SNH news

'Beavers shot on Tayside' article by Rob Edwards in the Ferret

Conflict in the countryside

Rewilding Scotland on Facebook

Book Review: Rewilding in Scotland is different ball game from USA - Chris Townsend

Lynx project fuelling fear among farmers: Bridget Morris

Conservationists are at odds over claims that an isolated population of pure Scottish wildcats has been discovered in Aberdeenshire
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Date:
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A stuffed wildcat, Felis silvestris, in the Zoology Department, Aberdeen University

A stuffed wildcat, Felis silvestris, in the Zoology Department, Aberdeen University

WILDCATS, EAGLES and SALMON

Press release from Vicky MacDonald, Scottish Wildcat Action 30.01.2016
Stuffed wildcat photograph: Yvonne Ferguson

The largest-ever survey of Scottish wildcats is now underway with more than three hundred cameras live. The survey focuses on the wildcat priority areas of Scotland - Strathpeffer, Strathbogie, Strathavon, North Strathspey and the Angus Glens.

The cameras will monitor movements over a sixty-day period. Survey methods are informed by published scientific studies and a practical hands-on approach. More than one hundred and thirty volunteers will check the cameras. Data gathered will help inform wildcat protection measures including an extensive neutering campaign to stop feral and pet cats from interbreeding and passing on diseases.

Many wildcats in Scotland contain some domestic cat ancestry and wildcats will continue to become less distinctive if this is left unchecked. Scottish Wildcat Action is committed to reducing the risk of interbreeding between wildcats and domestic cats or obvious hybrids. This includes working with local communities and estates to protect our remaining wildcats and gearing up for a co-ordinated Trap Neuter Vaccinate and Release programme next summer. Unowned domestic cats and obvious hybrids will be trapped, neutered and vaccinated before being returned to the wild under licence from Scottish Natural Heritage (SNH).

The Scottish Wildcat is one of our most endangered mammals and our only remaining native cat. It urgently needs action to save shrinking populations in the wild. Following habitat loss and persecution through the 19th century, the wildcat is now restricted in the U.K. to the Scottish Highlands. More about the project and to report sightings of wild-living cats

No genetically-pure wildcats have been identified in the last thirty years. It may have lost all of its nine lives


Unusual wildlife tales – eagles and salmon

Almost 200 years have elapsed since the 1816 journey of writer Elizabeth Isabella Spence to the North Highlands, which left some unusual accounts of interactions between humans and nature. Two in particular stand out; both concern the countryside around the Falls of Kilmorack on the River Beauly. The rocks above the river were ‘infested with eagles’ and the nests the birds built, while on steep precipices, were nevertheless accessible to people who had the relevant skill and nerve. One ‘poor cottager’ was noted as regularly providing his large family with young lambs, kids and poultry on the kitchen table and he was suspected of obtaining these items by theft. The accusation was only true insofar as he was found to be daily plundering eyries to feed his own offspring.

An even stranger account is of ‘an experiment’ conducted by Fraser of Lovat. Salmon were regularly seen leaping their way through the Falls and sometimes landing on the flat rocks adjacent to the water. Lovat made a wager that, ‘if a fire were lighted on one of the rocks verging on the river, and a pot boiled on it, a salmon, taking a contrary leap, would plunge into the boiler, and be dressed, ready for eating, without the aid of cooking’. According to Spence, he ‘gained his wager’. Such a remarkable occurrence would be impossible today: the Falls disappeared when a hydro-electric scheme was built in the 1960s.
SNH news

'Beavers shot on Tayside' article by Rob Edwards in the Ferret

Conflict in the countryside

Rewilding Scotland on Facebook

Book Review: Rewilding in Scotland is different ball game from USA - Chris Townsend

Lynx project fuelling fear among farmers: Bridget Morris

Conservationists are at odds over claims that an isolated population of pure Scottish wildcats has been discovered in Aberdeenshire
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: