The wave that hit us - Scottish weather.

The wave that hit us - Scottish weather.

Weather reports.
The clean-up from the far-from-perfect 15th December 2012 storm was underway, when another struck - two days of constant rain, a 5M swell and 60mph winds (22nd/23rd December). Roads were closed by severe flooding across Scotland. Environmental protection agency Sepa issued dozens of flood warnings. There was no rail travel out of Aberdeen. NorthLink ferries did not sail between the Northern Isles and Aberdeen: Tesco chartered a Hercules transporter plane to fly supplies to Shetland. 50 residents were evacuated from their homes in Stonehaven - rescued by (Maritime Rescue-staffed) inflatable boats through floodwater 1M deep - after the River Carron burst its banks, as it did in 2009.

A planned World Snow Day event at the Glenshee Ski Centre on Sunday 20th January was cancelled because the A93 past Braemar was closed, due to snow. Parents forsook their 4x4s and pulled children to school in Aberdeenshire on sledges. I got pulled to school - by my ear. It was traumatic.

In a winter that keeps on giving, we've endured a snow-bound Easter. Kintyre has witnessed the worst snow for 50 years. 1500 Arran folk went without power for 6 days. Scottish farmers face logistical problems at the start of the lambing season; 10,000 sheep and lambs have perished. Hundreds of seabirds, including puffins, have been washed up dead on the coastline. 13 skiers, climbers and walkers have died on Scotland's mountains in the first 3 months of 2013, many in avalanches. Due to the prolonged cold, campaigners predict 30,000 excess winter deaths in Scotland this year - 6000 more than in 2012.

Not poles apart comes a report that the magnetic forces in under-wired bras affects compasses, reversing polarity and causing misnavigation. Ditch the bra and you won't go South suddenly, down not up the way.

To cup it all (sic), a freak sandstorm on April 16th blocked roads and caused drifting throughout North-East of Scotland. Morayshire was hit by a second bout of freak sandstorms on April 22nd, causing widespread damage to crops, particularly the distillery-bound barley harvest.

With the summer solstice 28 days away, some Scots woke to a blanket of snow. A blast of wintry weather swept in from the Arctic, bringing blizzards and icy temperatures to the North-east. Drifting snow closed two roads, and many more were only passable with care. The snow gates on the A939 Cockbridge to Tomintoul road and the A93 between Braemar and Glenshee had to be closed to traffic at first light. The A939, a busy route for tourists between Royal Deeside, Strathdon and Speyside, remained closed for most of the day, as fresh snow showers, driven in on strong northerly winds, swept across the area, reducing temperatures to as low as –3C. Spring 2013 is the coldest in the UK for more than 30 years.

The village of Forvie was buried by sand during a great southerly storm in 1413. All that remains today is the 12C Forvie Kirk (see photo in this gallery). In 1694 a ferocious storm buried the village of Findhorn and a vast farming estate at Culbin on the Moray Firth.

This destructive weather of 2013 pales compared to the events of 31st January 1953. With winds speeds reaching over 125mph, the Muckle Blaw or Great Gale killed 5 people in Aberdeenshire (326 throughout Britain: 1836 in Holland). The 'beast from the east' storm sixty years ago left 1000 Scots homeless, flattened 4000 acres of forestry and devastated many North-East communities, including Gardenstown, Crovie, Banff, Ballater and Maud.
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The wave that hit us - Scottish weather.

The wave that hit us - Scottish weather.

Weather reports.
The clean-up from the far-from-perfect 15th December 2012 storm was underway, when another struck - two days of constant rain, a 5M swell and 60mph winds (22nd/23rd December). Roads were closed by severe flooding across Scotland. Environmental protection agency Sepa issued dozens of flood warnings. There was no rail travel out of Aberdeen. NorthLink ferries did not sail between the Northern Isles and Aberdeen: Tesco chartered a Hercules transporter plane to fly supplies to Shetland. 50 residents were evacuated from their homes in Stonehaven - rescued by (Maritime Rescue-staffed) inflatable boats through floodwater 1M deep - after the River Carron burst its banks, as it did in 2009.

A planned World Snow Day event at the Glenshee Ski Centre on Sunday 20th January was cancelled because the A93 past Braemar was closed, due to snow. Parents forsook their 4x4s and pulled children to school in Aberdeenshire on sledges. I got pulled to school - by my ear. It was traumatic.

In a winter that keeps on giving, we've endured a snow-bound Easter. Kintyre has witnessed the worst snow for 50 years. 1500 Arran folk went without power for 6 days. Scottish farmers face logistical problems at the start of the lambing season; 10,000 sheep and lambs have perished. Hundreds of seabirds, including puffins, have been washed up dead on the coastline. 13 skiers, climbers and walkers have died on Scotland's mountains in the first 3 months of 2013, many in avalanches. Due to the prolonged cold, campaigners predict 30,000 excess winter deaths in Scotland this year - 6000 more than in 2012.

Not poles apart comes a report that the magnetic forces in under-wired bras affects compasses, reversing polarity and causing misnavigation. Ditch the bra and you won't go South suddenly, down not up the way.

To cup it all (sic), a freak sandstorm on April 16th blocked roads and caused drifting throughout North-East of Scotland. Morayshire was hit by a second bout of freak sandstorms on April 22nd, causing widespread damage to crops, particularly the distillery-bound barley harvest.

With the summer solstice 28 days away, some Scots woke to a blanket of snow. A blast of wintry weather swept in from the Arctic, bringing blizzards and icy temperatures to the North-east. Drifting snow closed two roads, and many more were only passable with care. The snow gates on the A939 Cockbridge to Tomintoul road and the A93 between Braemar and Glenshee had to be closed to traffic at first light. The A939, a busy route for tourists between Royal Deeside, Strathdon and Speyside, remained closed for most of the day, as fresh snow showers, driven in on strong northerly winds, swept across the area, reducing temperatures to as low as –3C. Spring 2013 is the coldest in the UK for more than 30 years.

The village of Forvie was buried by sand during a great southerly storm in 1413. All that remains today is the 12C Forvie Kirk (see photo in this gallery). In 1694 a ferocious storm buried the village of Findhorn and a vast farming estate at Culbin on the Moray Firth.

This destructive weather of 2013 pales compared to the events of 31st January 1953. With winds speeds reaching over 125mph, the Muckle Blaw or Great Gale killed 5 people in Aberdeenshire (326 throughout Britain: 1836 in Holland). The 'beast from the east' storm sixty years ago left 1000 Scots homeless, flattened 4000 acres of forestry and devastated many North-East communities, including Gardenstown, Crovie, Banff, Ballater and Maud.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: