Telford bridge, Craigellachie

Telford bridge, Craigellachie

This famous Scottish bridge has been featured among a new set of Royal Mail stamps. The landmark Craigellachie Bridge over the River Spey is celebrated as a civil engineering feat. The 150ft wide bridge was built by Thomas Telford in 1812. It is the oldest surviving example of his classic pre-fabricated lozenge-lattice arch design. Cast in iron sections in Wales, it was transported by sea to the Moray Firth. From there it was taken by horse-drawn wagons to the village of Craigellachie.

Campaigners hope that the inclusion of the bridge in the set of stamps will aid bids to repair it. Moray Council said that it would not allow the bridge to fall into serious disrepair, although spending on it was not a current priority.

Andrew Hammond, head of stamps and collectibles at Royal Mail, said of the ten selections for the set: "The story of Britain's engineering genius can be found in its bridges.”

Other featured bridges are Tarr Steps (Exmoor), Row Bridge (Lake District). Pulteney Bridge (Bath), Pont Grog y Borth/Menai Suspension Bridge; Robert Stephenson's High Level Bridge (Newcastle/Gateshead), Royal Border Bridge (Berwick-upon-Tweed); Tees Transporter Bridge (Middlesbrough), the Humber Bridge, and the Peace Bridge in Northern Ireland.

A search has been launched to establish who actually owns the bridge.
It had generally been assumed the bridge was owned by Moray Council, which carries out maintenance. However, in 2017 the local authority confirmed it does not actually own the bridge. The Friends of Craigellachie Bridge group now aims to solve the mystery of who the owners are.
It is hoped that establishing ownership could help the bridge become more of a tourist attraction.

Moray MSP Richard Lochhead, who is backing efforts to identify the owner, said it was a "bizarre" situation.
He said: "We need to find out who owns it so the local community has more of a say over its future."

Thomas Telford was born in the Scottish Borders at Westerkirk in 1757, and became an apprentice stonemason at the age of 14. As his career progressed, his work became celebrated. He worked as principal engineer on the Caledonian Canal, a remarkable engineering feat when it was eventually completed in 1822. The canal cuts through the Great Glen, following a geological fault-line. It links three Lochs (Ness, Oich and Lochy), and Inverness on the Moray Firth to Fort William on Scotland's west coast. At Fort William a series of eight locks called Neptune's Staircase is a favourite tourist attraction on the canal. Originally hand-powered but now converted to hydraulic operation, it is the longest staircase lock in Britain.

For photos taken along the canal see the rest of this gallery. Contact us if you can't find specific subjects - only a selection is displayed.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer:
Telford bridge, Craigellachie

Telford bridge, Craigellachie

This famous Scottish bridge has been featured among a new set of Royal Mail stamps. The landmark Craigellachie Bridge over the River Spey is celebrated as a civil engineering feat. The 150ft wide bridge was built by Thomas Telford in 1812. It is the oldest surviving example of his classic pre-fabricated lozenge-lattice arch design. Cast in iron sections in Wales, it was transported by sea to the Moray Firth. From there it was taken by horse-drawn wagons to the village of Craigellachie.

Campaigners hope that the inclusion of the bridge in the set of stamps will aid bids to repair it. Moray Council said that it would not allow the bridge to fall into serious disrepair, although spending on it was not a current priority.

Andrew Hammond, head of stamps and collectibles at Royal Mail, said of the ten selections for the set: "The story of Britain's engineering genius can be found in its bridges.”

Other featured bridges are Tarr Steps (Exmoor), Row Bridge (Lake District). Pulteney Bridge (Bath), Pont Grog y Borth/Menai Suspension Bridge; Robert Stephenson's High Level Bridge (Newcastle/Gateshead), Royal Border Bridge (Berwick-upon-Tweed); Tees Transporter Bridge (Middlesbrough), the Humber Bridge, and the Peace Bridge in Northern Ireland.

A search has been launched to establish who actually owns the bridge.
It had generally been assumed the bridge was owned by Moray Council, which carries out maintenance. However, in 2017 the local authority confirmed it does not actually own the bridge. The Friends of Craigellachie Bridge group now aims to solve the mystery of who the owners are.
It is hoped that establishing ownership could help the bridge become more of a tourist attraction.

Moray MSP Richard Lochhead, who is backing efforts to identify the owner, said it was a "bizarre" situation.
He said: "We need to find out who owns it so the local community has more of a say over its future."

Thomas Telford was born in the Scottish Borders at Westerkirk in 1757, and became an apprentice stonemason at the age of 14. As his career progressed, his work became celebrated. He worked as principal engineer on the Caledonian Canal, a remarkable engineering feat when it was eventually completed in 1822. The canal cuts through the Great Glen, following a geological fault-line. It links three Lochs (Ness, Oich and Lochy), and Inverness on the Moray Firth to Fort William on Scotland's west coast. At Fort William a series of eight locks called Neptune's Staircase is a favourite tourist attraction on the canal. Originally hand-powered but now converted to hydraulic operation, it is the longest staircase lock in Britain.

For photos taken along the canal see the rest of this gallery. Contact us if you can't find specific subjects - only a selection is displayed.
Ref:
Date:
Location:
Photographer: